Aid. Truth. Transformation.

‘Caritas in Veritate International’ is a confederation of Catholic institutions, dedicated to recruiting, forming, mobilizing and engaging young volunteers, to bring charity in truth, and human progress to all people.

Prof. Pasquale

 

Justice and mercy in the Bible

Download Text in English
 
Download Text in Italian

The theme of my presentation centres on the relationship between justice and mercy in the Holy Scriptures. I will start from a semantic analysis of the word "justice" in the OT (Old Testament) and NT (New Testament). Later I will focus on one part of the Bible, chapters 1:16-4:25 of Romans, the section where our theme is tackled by Paul in a wonderful way.

First, what does the word justice, in Greek dikaiosyne mean[1]? The root of this term, dik- contains the idea of ​​conformity; compliance to the terms of the covenant. God is the subject of the covenant and thus subject also of justification. God alone is righteous and He alone justifies. Man can also be called righteous. But this is very rare (we can think of Joseph being called righteous in the Gospel of Matthew). The righteous is a person who conforms him/herself to the law and obeys God by recognizing the gratuitousness of the covenant. In the Old Testament, covenant is never bilateral, but always unilateral. It is God who makes a covenant with Israel and even when Israel does not follow Him, God remains faithful.

The Qumran community, especially, arrived at this understanding of God's justice. In the Rule of this Community it is written: "From the source of his righteousness comes my justification", that is, if I am justified it is not because I am righteous, but because I'm under a fountain of Justice, which is God. Again: "My righteousness is in the Justice of God ", that is, if I'm righteous it is because divine justice declares me so. In fragment 403: "God will bless all who are designated for righteousness". Fragment 404: "The sons of righteousness are righteous through divine choice, not by themselves"[2].

For the Pharisees, works and being righteous are rather a merit before God.

The verb dikaioo occurs 15 times in Romans and always has God as its subject. It is a causative verb which should therefore be translated as "declare righteous." Its use is very wide in the Septuagint (LXX). In the Psalms and in DeuteroIsaiah, the word justice always recalls the notion of ​​salvation and not the condemnation of the sinner. Our mentality is that if God is just, then the sinner is condemned. In the Bible it is the opposite: God is just, so He saves. We read in Isaiah 56:1:

[1] Thus says the Lord:                                                                                                     

"Observe the law and practice justice,                                                                                

because my salvation is soon to come;                                                                                         

my righteousness is about to be revealed."

That is, the justice of God is always justice of salvation[3]. In the Bible you can always replace justice with salvation.

In Latin, justice designates a virtue whereby unicuique suum, (which is also the subtitle of L'Osservatore Romano) each one gets his/her due. The righteous man is one who recognizes the other's rights. But it is not so with the justice of God, which in the entire Bible is always God's faithfulness to his promises. When we think that God is just, and sees everything, and will therefore make each one pay sooner or later for his/her deeds, we think blasphemy. And even more (are we blasphemous) when we say "He is merciful, but also just," because this phrase does not stand. The justice of God is manifested in his being merciful. For the Bible, if He is not merciful, He is neither just. Anyone who insists on justice will speak of the merits, like the Pharisees who spoke of meritorious works that obtain for us the justice of God. But this was not biblical, and Jesus demonstrated it perfectly. God is just and wishes the good of man. He reveals Himself fully when He accomplishes in Jesus and in his cross the salvation of humanity. God had promised Abraham: "In you shall be blessed all the families of the earth"; God blesses all nations through Christ and through the Gospel. In this light, to justify never means to give approval to man or recognize his innocence or his personal merits. It is far from it. It rather means that, freely, and faithful to Himself, God proclaims a judgment of righteousness and grace by granting to man justice that saves him and enables him to access the blessings of His promise. In this perspective, pride and human merit have no place. Man is but an object of grace.

The justice of God signifies mercy; justice not in terms of the Hebrew word zedakah (Justice understood as unicuique suum), but mispat (judgment in which the judge is on the side of the offender). At Qumran, it will later be affirmed with Paul that now the judgment of God is mercy. In the rule of the community in chapter 11 the monk who has concluded his novitiate when he makes the promise of community life recites: "In his mercy, He has made me come closer and in his grace He will bring me to righteousness. With His true justice He has justified me, in His great goodness He will forgive my sins, for His righteousness, He will justify me from human iniquity and from the sins of the sons of men."

For Paul, however, the question is: where is this justice of God revealed? The answer is easy: in the Gospel. In Romans 1:16-17 we read:

[16] For I am not ashamed of the gospel, it is the power of God for salvation to everyone who believes, to the Jew first and then to the Greek. [17] It is in it that the justice of God is revealed from faith to faith; as it is written: The just shall live by faith.

Paul affirms that in the gospel is active the power of salvation, a dynamis, an energy that saves[4]. And in this same Gospel it is clearly shown what the justice of God consists in. We have already seen how in the OT the justice of God coincides with his mercy. Though it is also judgment, it is basically holiness; it is His Holiness. God is right when He grants his hesed, mercy. For the Greek, justice is the court; while for the Latin, the dike becomes ‘to each his own’. But this idea of ​​justice is not biblical, because for the Scripture one is righteous when he abounds in mercy. Only those who are capable of gentleness, kindness, forgiveness can be defined as righteous. If God had acted in accordance with Greek or Latin Justice, He would have had to destroy sinful man, but God shows his justice when He asks Christ to go the cross. The world is judged by the cross of Christ because if the only One who is righteous and innocent is condemned to death, this means that there is no justice on earth. But the cross does not only judge the world, it also justifies it, it is at that moment the world is saved. It is therefore in the Gospel that justice is made manifest in an unprecedented way.

After telling us rapidly that the gospel reveals God's justice, Paul in 1:18-3:20 changes the discourse focusing his attention not on divine justice, but on human injustice. The apostle sets off from the wrath of God, which is not a feeling, but the exercise of divine justice with respect to human behaviour. It is as if Paul wants to tell us that if God were to act according to human justice He would go angry because men have an unfair and unjust behaviour. In 1:18-31 Paul observes principally the pagan side of humanity. They are all idolaters. Even though they could have known God through reason they adored animals, quadrupeds, snakes. Also, on the level of sexual comportment they are filthy. Here Paul makes a black speech, exasperated against the pagans. The Jews called them "dogs" in that like dogs they were notoriously bisexual. Jesus, however, with infinite tenderness will say to the Syro-Phoenician woman that it is not fair to take the children's bread and give it to the puppy dogs. Puppy dogs, not dogs as the Jews used to say. The apostle here wants only to show how big the sin of pagan humanity is. And he uses the reasons for antipagan Jewish propaganda. They are in fact also described with an impressive list of vices:

[29] They were filled with all unrighteousness, wickedness, covetousness, maliciousness; full of envy, murder, strife, deceit, malignity; slanderers, [30] backbiters, haters of God, insolent, haughty, boastful, inventors of evil, disobedient to parents, [31] foolish, faithless, heartless, merciless.

If God were to take action against such humanity He would do well to get angry, destroying them all. But after having reviewed the vices of pagans, Paul begins to also examine the Jews in chapter 2:

[1] You are therefore without excuse, whoever you are, O man who judges; because you judge another, you condemn yourself; In fact, you who judge practice the same things.

If the great sin of the pagan is idolatry, the Jew is one who judges instead, an implacable judge of others, whose basic sin consists, not in idolatry, but in schlerokardia, hardness of heart[5]. One who judges has already sinned and the Jews judge with hardness of heart. Here Paul shows the behaviour of the religious man, the one who feels he is on the side of God, but who judges others.

Paul reminds the Jew of his own (of the Jew) theology.

First: God rewards each one according to his works. God gives eternal life to those who do good but also tribulation and anguish to those who do evil. The judgment of God begins in his house. The first to be judged will be the Jews, because they had the law, the gifts, the covenant: to whom much has be given much will be expected. The first to be judged by God will be bishops and priests.

Second: God is impartial. He makes no difference between people. As regards the negative retribution, there is no ethnic difference. If you do evil, regardless of the group to which you belong, you are condemned.

Third: God wants the circumcision of the heart, not of the foreskin. So having the law, being Jewish or being circumcised does not save me, because what counts before the justice of God is not doing evil. And on the other hand, the Jew also, as the heathen, cannot be considered righteous before God.

Paul has thus shown how all men are sinners, and he made an ethnic levelling with respect to retribution. All are sinners. In confirmation of this thesis Paul puts together verses of the OT that affirm this truth. This has to do with scriptural cento, according to the technique of pearl chain, that is, a series of citations on the same theme (haruzin)[6], in which is shown the universality of sin and its presence in all parts of the human body:

[10] As it is written: There is none righteous, not even one,                                                        

[11] no one understands, no one seeks for God!                                                                         

[12] All have gone astray, they are perverted;                                                                             

there is none who does good; there is not even one.                                                                    

[13] Their throat is a wide open sepulchre,                                                                                             

            they deceive with their tongues,                                                                                                   

the poison of serpents is under their lips,                                                                       

[14] their mouth is full of cursing and bitterness.                                                           

[15] Their feet are swift to shed blood;                                                                                       

[16] destruction and misery are in their ways                                                                             

[17] and the way of peace they do not know.                                                                             

[18] There is no fear of God before their eyes.

Ultimately, if God were to intervene with his anger, according to human justice, there would be no salvation for man. There is need therefore for a different justice. It is necessary that one gets out of this desperate situation of humanity, this will be shown in Romans 3:21- 4:25. The new act that was not reasonable to expect is Jesus Christ. It is He who changes the situation of humanity. Christ is the place where we see the justice of God. God is supremely just in Christ. Indeed, when God is absolutely angry you know what He does? He sends the Son to die on the cross.

From this emerges then another framework of justice. It is not a forensic, human, tribunal judgment. Faith in Christ is able to have that which one could not get through works. After all regardless of the number of works I may be able to carry out none of them can guarantee my salvation, because none of them deserves the death of Christ on the cross. Faith in Christ is what brings to all believers the salvation of God. If we live pistis Cristou, that is, the faith that Jesus Christ has shown us, transmitted, taught, this puts us in a righteous relationship with God.

All sinners are justified freely, as the accumulation of these vocabularies which express the reality of redemption show in Romans 3:23-25: dorean (free), Cariti (grace), apolutrosis (redemption), ilasterion (expiation), aima (blood)[7]. In redemptive vocabulary there is the idea that someone had to pay a ransom to get what was lost. This is Jesus Christ. We have a clearer idea if we consider the ilasterion, the top of the ark of the Covenant, a gold foil that covers the ark, in Hebrew "kapporet". On the day of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, all the sins of the people are poured on a goat which is then sent into the desert to die with all the sins which were laid upon it. Every Jewish community had its emissary goat. But in the temple there is a scapegoat that is slaughtered, whose blood is collected and poured on the ark of the Covenant. The moment the blood touches the ilasterion sins are forgiven. The text of Tashlik (exorcism on sins) of Micah which is recited at that moment is beautiful: He throws your sins in the depths of the sea, that is, He does not just erase it, but actually destroys them. Now, Christ is the place where the sin of humanity is put back, deleted, through faith in his blood, in the sense that Christ's blood has salvific value. He is the new ilasterion. So the justice of God is the cross of Christ.

The first consequence of the salvation brought by Christ is the disappearance of pride. If everything has been donated who can boast before God? None. Paul at the end speaks of two witnesses of justification by faith alone, and of the disappearance of pride: Abraham and David[8]. In Gen 15:6 we read: "Abraham believed God, and it was counted to him as righteousness." But what is surprising is the comment of Paul on this verse:

[4] To one who works, wages are not counted as a favor, but as a debt that is paid,                      

[5] to one who does not work but believes in Him who justifies the wicked, such faith is taken into account and that person is held as righteous.

If one works it is necessary that he/she be paid his/her salary. But there are also those who do not work, and so do not have claims to make before God, if not their faith in a God who justifies the wicked. Here Paul recovers the OT where it is said that God is able to justify the wicked. In fact one cannot justify the wicked, nor evil. But if the wicked believes that God can save him/her, then this act of faith in God saves him/her, this is so because the truth is that no one is righteous before God, we are all wicked. Abraham believed in a God who justifies. King David had the same faith. As witnessed from Psalm 32:

[7] Blessed are they whose iniquities were remitted and whose sins were covered;            

[8] blessed is the man whose sin God does not count.

David is guilty of two enormous sins for which there is no possibility of pardon according to Jewish law: adultery with Bathsheba and murder of Uriah. But David, knowing that he was lost, makes recourse to the only possibility that remains: perhaps God justifies the wicked. He could not rely on his circumcision to be part of a friendly relationship with God; nor could he even leverage on the works of the law, such as an animal sacrifice. This is because nothing would have brought Uriah back to life. The only option is to make an act of faith in Him who justifies the wicked. And at the moment he discovers that he has been forgiven, he sings this psalm. The psalm shows that God really does not take record of sins, He is not an accountant who calculates income and expenditure. If God really took record of sins, we would all be lost[9].

God justifies the wicked. Justice may not necessarily relate to the worker because, if it did, it would remain in the field of recognition of one’s performance. The righteous man is not primarily the one who does works or that works, but the one who believes in spite of his wickedness. Because of his faith, this man is no longer wicked. Can we say the same about the one who fulfils the works of the law, without faith? Can it be said that the worker will never be wicked? Or in wanting to establish his righteousness on what he does, and not in God, proves already his/her wickedness? The wicked that opens the door to faith erases all forms of unrighteousness in relation to God, because he/she relies on God. One who works is not said to rely on another, in fact he/she may even have as his/her standard of responsibility a bulwark of justice with which to strike at those who do not work. The discourse of Romans 4:4-5 on salary serves to show that the relationship between God and man is not on the basis of symmetry, but it is an asymmetrical situation in which God gives freely. Behind the denial of commercial criteria is hidden a much more fundamental discussion that touches the ways in which divine justice is expressed: God does not act according to the logic of salary, but on the modality of an attitude of grace, just as you can have with the wicked.

Paul closes his long argument in Rom 4:25 saying:

[25] Jesus was put to death for our sins and was raised for our justification.

Jesus dies on the cross as a generous gesture of love to justify man from his sins. The death on the Cross and the Resurrection mean that God believes deeply that every man can be what Abraham was, a man of faith provided he believes[10]. God's desire to justify and to give life to men has not changed from Abraham to us. Indeed, God's generosity has reached its highest point with the gift of his Son to men. This is the justice of God. That is His unprecedented generosity.

Pasquale Basta

Professor of Biblical Theology

Pontifical University Urbaniana




[1] For root dik- see K. Kertelge, «Rechtfertigung» bei Paulus. Studien zur Struktur und zum Bedeutungsgehalt des paulinischen Rechtfertigungsbegriffs (NTA 3; Münster: Aschendorff, 1967); tr. it. «Giustificazione» in Paolo. Studi sulla struttura e sul significato del concetto paolino di giustificazione (GLNT.S 5; Brescia: Paideia, 1991).

[2] For Qumran Manuscripts see G. J. Brooke, The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament (Philadelphia, PA: Fortress, 2005).F. García Martínez (ed.), Echoes from the Caves. Qumran and the New Testament (Studies on the Texts of the Desert of Judah 85; Leiden – Boston: Brill, 2009); L. H. Schiffman – J. C. VanderKam (ed.), Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls (Oxford: University Press, 2000) I-II; H. Stegemann, Die Essener, Qumran, Johannes der Täufer und Jesus. Ein Sachbuch (Spektrum 4128; Freiburg: Herder, 1993); tr. it. Gli Esseni, Qumran, Giovanni Battista e Gesù. Una monografia (Collana di studi religiosi; Bologna: EDB, 1995); tr. sp. Los esenios, Qumrán, Juan Bautista y Jesús (Colección estructuras u procesos Serie Religión; Madrid: Trotta, 1996); tr. ingl. The Library of Qumran. On the Essenes, Qumran, John the Baptist, and Jesus (Grand Rapids, MI – Leiden: Eerdmans – Brill, 1998); J. C. VanderKam, From Joshua to Caiaphas. High Priests after the Exile (Minneapolis, MN – Assen: Fortress – Van Gorcum, 2004); J. C. VanderKam, The Dead Sea Scrolls Today (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1994); tr. it. Manoscritti del Mar Morto. Il dibattito recente oltre le polemiche (Roma: Città Nuova, 1995); J. C. VanderKam – P. Flint, The Meaning of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Their Significance for Understanding the Bible, Judaism, Jesus, and Christianity (New York: HarperSanFrancisco, 2002).

[3] For Isaiah 56 cf. J. D. W. Watts, Isaiah 35-66 (WBC 25; Waco, TX: Word Books, 1987; Nashville, TN: Th. Nelson, 22006); P. D. Hanson, Isaiah 40-66 (Interpretation. A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching; Louisville, KY: John Knox, 1995); B. S. Childs, Isaiah. A Commentary (OTL; London: SCM – Louisville, KY: John Knox Westminster, 2000); J. L. Koole, Isaiah III (Historical Commentary on the Old Testament; Leuven: Peeters, 2001); J. Blenkinsopp, Isaiah 56-66. A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary (AB 19B; New York: Doubleday, 2003); J. Goldingay, Isaiah 56-66 (A Critical and Exegetical Commentary; London – New York: T&T Clark, 2013).

[4] For Romans see C. E. B. Cranfield, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (ICC; Edinburgh: Clark, 1987) I-II; C. K Barrett, A Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (BNTC; London 1957; London – New York 21991); J. D. G. Dunn, Romans (WBC 38A, 38B; Dallas, TX: Word Books, 1988); J. A. Fitzmyer, Romans (AncB 33; New York: Doubleday, 1993); D. J. Moo, The Epistle to the Romans (NICNT; Grand Rapids, MI 1996); L. T. Johnson, Reading Romans. A Literary and Theological Commentary (Reading the New Testament series; New York 1997); C. Bryan, A Preface to Romans. Notes on the Epistle in its Literary and Cultural Setting (Oxford 2000); C. H. Talbert, Romans (SHBC; Macon, GA 2002).

[5] See J. N. Aletti, Justification by faith in the Letters of Saint Paul: keys to interpretation (Analecta Biblica. Studia 5; Gregorian & Biblical Press, Roma 2015).

[6] For Jewish Hermeneutic see D. Patte, Early Jewish Hermeneutic in Palestine (SBL DS 22; Missoula 1975); H. L. Strack – G. Stemberger, Einleitung in Talmud und Midrasch, Beck, München 71982; M. Fishbane, Biblical Interpretation in Ancient Israel (Oxford 1985); J. Neusner, What is Midrash? (Philadelphia 1987); R. Kasher, «The Interpretation of Scripture in Rabbinic Literature», Mikra. Text, Translation, Reading and Interpretation of the Hebrew Bible in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (ed. M. J. Mulder) (Philadelphia/Assen/Mastricht 1988) 547-594; R. N. Longenecker, Biblical Exegesis in the Apostolic Period (Grand Rapids MI 1992).

[7] P. Basta, «L’accumulo del vocabolario redentivo in Rm 3,21-26. Motivazioni e pertinenze», in Studium Personae III/2 (2012) 61-80.

[8] P. Basta, «La utilización paulina de la gezerah shawah rabínica. De la halakah sobre pesah de Hillel al Abraham de Rom 4», in Revista Bíblica 72 (2010) 53-89; Id., «Paul and the gezerah shawah: A Judaic Method in the Service of Justification by Faith», in T. G. Casey – J. Taylor (eds.) Paul’s Jewish Matrix (Bible in Dialogue 2; Roma – Mahwah, NJ 2011) 123-165.

[9] P. Basta, Abramo in Romani 4. L’analogia dell’agire divino nella ricerca esegetica di Paolo (Analecta Biblica 168; Pontificio Istituto Biblico, Roma 2007).

[10] L. Novakovic, Raised from the Dead According to Scripture. The Role of Israel’s Scripture in the Early Christian Interpretations of Jesus’ Resurrection (T & T Clark Jewish and Christian Texts in Contexts and Related Studies Series 12; London - New Delhi, Bloomsbury, 2012).


 

Giustizia e misericordia nella Bibbia

Download Text in English
 
Download Text in Italian
 

Il tema di questo mio intervento riguarda il rapporto tra giustizia e misericordia all’interno delle sacre Scritture. Siamo nel giubileo straordinario della misericordia e quindi è un tema estremamente opportuno. Cercare di sintetizzare ciò di cui la Bibbia parla in lungo ed in largo è una impresa ardua, ragion per cui sono costretto a fare delle scelte.

Comincerò da una analisi semantica della parola “giustizia” in AT e NT, incrociandola con considerazioni teologico-bibliche di base. In un secondo momento mi concentrerò su una parte della Bibbia, i capitoli 1,16-4,25 della lettera ai Romani, sezione in cui il nostro tema è affrontato da Paolo in maniera mirabile.

Innanzitutto, cosa significa la parola giustizia, in greco dikaiosyne[1]? C’è una radice dik- che contiene l’idea di conformità. Conformità nel quadro dell’alleanza in cui Dio è il soggetto dell’alleanza e quindi anche della giustificazione. Dio solo è giusto e giustifica anche se l’uomo può essere chiamato a sua volta giusto. Anche se questo è molto raro (si pensi a Giuseppe chiamato giusto nel vangelo di Matteo). Il giusto è colui che rende conforme se stesso alla legge, conformandosi alla chiamata di Dio che lo precede sempre.  Il giusto non è colui che si arroga diritti su Dio, ma è colui che gli obbedisce riconoscendo la gratuità e l’unilateralità del gesto di alleanza. Nell’AT l’alleanza non è mai bilaterale, ma sempre unilaterale. È Dio che fa alleanza con Israele e anche quando Israele non lo segue, Dio resta comunque fedele. A questa comprensione della giustizia di Dio era giunta soprattutto la comunità di Qumran. E poi anche Paolo nella lettera ai Romani che nei capitoli 1-4 affronta, come vi ho già accennato, proprio il nostro tema della giustizia e della misericordia di Dio.

Nella Regola della Comunità di Qumran si legge: “Dalla fonte della sua giustizia viene la mia giustificazione”, cioè se io sono giustificato non è perché io sono giusto, ma perché sto sotto una fontana di giustizia che è Dio. Ancora: “La mia giustizia sta nella giustizia di Dio”, cioè se io sono giusto è perché la giustizia divina mi dichiara tale. Nel frammento 403: “Dio benedirà tutti i designati della giustizia”. Frammento 404: “I figli della giustizia sono giusti per scelta divina, non da se stessi” [2].

Per i farisei le opere e l’essere giusto sono invece un merito davanti a Dio.

Il verbo dikaioo ricorre 15 volte in Romani ed ha sempre Dio per soggetto. È un verbo causativo che va quindi tradotto con “dichiarare giusto”. Il suo uso è molto largo nella LXX. Nei Salmi e nel DeuteroIsaia la parola giustizia richiama sempre una idea di salvezza e non la condanna del peccatore. Il nostro schema è che se Dio è giusto allora il peccatore è condannato. Nella Bibbia è il contrario: Dio è giusto, perciò salva. Leggiamo Is 51,1-5:

[1] Ascoltatemi, voi che siete in cerca di giustizia, 
voi che cercate il Signore; 
guardate alla roccia da cui siete stati tagliati, 
alla cava da cui siete stati estratti. 
[2] Guardate ad Abramo vostro padre, 
a Sara che vi ha partorito; 
poiché io chiamai lui solo, 
lo benedissi e lo moltiplicai. 
[3] Davvero il Signore ha pietà di Sion, 
ha pietà di tutte le sue rovine, 
rende il suo deserto come l'Eden, 
la sua steppa come il giardino del Signore. 
Giubilo e gioia saranno in essa, 
ringraziamenti e inni di lode! 
[5] La mia vittoria è vicina, 
si manifesterà come luce la mia giustizia; 
le mie braccia governeranno i popoli. 
In me spereranno le isole, 
avranno fiducia nel mio braccio. 

Quindi è Dio che fa venire la sua giustizia. Ed ancora Is 56,1:

[1] Così dice il Signore: 
"Osservate il diritto e praticate la giustizia, 
perché prossima a venire è la mia salvezza; 
la mia giustizia sta per rivelarsi". 

Cioè la giustizia di Dio è sempre giustizia di salvezza[3]. Nella Bibbia si può quasi sempre sostituire giustizia con salvezza.

In latino giustizia designa una virtù in base alla quale unicuique suum (che è anche il sottotitolo dell’Osservatore Romano). L’uomo giusto è colui che riconosce i diritti dell’altro. Ma non è così la giustizia di Dio, che in tutta la Bibbia è sempre fedeltà di Dio alle sue promesse. Dio è giusto perché è fedele a ciò che ha promesso ad Abramo. Quando noi pensiamo che Dio è giusto, e quindi vede tutto, e quindi la farà pagare prima o poi, pensiamo una bestemmia. Quando diciamo “Dio è giusto, quindi ci penserà lui” diciamo una bestemmia. E ancor di più quando diciamo “è misericordioso, ma anche giusto”, perché questa frase non si regge. Ora la giustizia di Dio si mostra nel suo essere misericordioso. Per la Bibbia se non è misericordioso, non è neanche giusto. Chi insiste sulla giustizia parlerà dei meriti, come i farisei che parlavano di opere meritorie che ci ottengono la giustizia di Dio. Ma questo non era biblico, e Gesù lo ha mostrato benissimo. Dio è giusto e vuole il bene dell’uomo. Egli è fedele alle sue promesse e realizza i suoi impegni. E Dio si rivela in pienezza quando realizza in Gesù e nella sua croce la salvezza dell’umanità. Dio aveva promesso ad Abramo: “In te saranno benedette tutte le stirpi della terra”, e Dio benedice tutte le genti attraverso Cristo ed il Vangelo. In questa luce giustificare non significa mai dar ragion all’uomo o riconoscere la sua innocenza o i suoi meriti personali. Tutt’altro. Significa invece che liberamente, con fedeltà a se stesso Dio proclama sull’uomo un verdetto di giustizia e di grazia, dando all’uomo un giudizio che lo salva e che lo fa accedere ai beni della promessa. In questa prospettiva l’orgoglio ed il vanto umano non hanno più posto. L’uomo è un graziato, un oggetto della grazia. Ecco perché Paolo parlerà in Romani 8 di nuova creazione, di vita da risorti, di uomo che vive dello Spirito Santo, di uomo coerede di Cristo ed erede di Dio. L’uomo giustificato è colui che porta frutti per Dio.

Ancora giustizia di Dio significa anche e soprattutto misericordia, non sempre con il termine ebraico della zedakah (giustizia del tipo unicuique suum), ma con mispat (giudizio in cui il giudice è molto dalla parte del reo). A Qumran si arriverà a dire con Paolo che ormai il giudizio di Dio è la misericordia. Nella regola della comunità al capitolo 11 il monaco che ha finito il suo noviziato nel momento in cui fa le promesse di vita comunitaria recita: “Nella sua misericordia mi ha fatto avvicinare e nella sua grazia mi porterà alla giustizia. Con la sua vera giustizia mi ha giustificato, nella sua grande bontà perdonerà i miei peccati, per la sua giustizia mi giustificherà dall’iniquità umana e dai peccati dei figli dell’uomo”.

Per Paolo però la domanda è: ma dove è il luogo in cui si rivela questa giustizia di Dio? La risposta è facile: nel Vangelo.

Seguiamo allora in rapida sintesi il discorso di Paolo. In Rm 1,16-17 si legge:

[16] Io infatti non mi vergogno del vangelo, poiché è potenza di Dio per la salvezza di chiunque crede, del Giudeo prima e poi del Greco. [17] È in esso che si rivela la giustizia di Dio di fede in fede, come sta scritto: Il giusto vivrà mediante la fede. 

Paolo afferma che nel vangelo è attiva una potenza di salvezza, una dynamis, una energia che salva[4]. Ed in questo stesso vangelo si mostra in maniera chiara in cosa consiste la giustizia di Dio. Abbiamo già visto come in AT la giustizia di Dio coincide con la sua misericordia. È anche giudizio ma è fondamentalmente santità, è la Sua Santità. Dio è giusto quando dà fondo alla sua hesed, misericordia. Per i greci la giustizia è il tribunale; mentre per i latini la dike diventa a ciascuno il suo. Ma questa idea di giustizia non è biblica, perché per la Scrittura uno è giusto quando sovrabbonda nella misericordia. Solo coloro che sono capaci di mitezza, bontà, perdono possono essere definiti giusti. Se Dio avesse agito in base alla giustizia greca o latina, avrebbe dovuto distruggere l’uomo peccatore, ma Dio mostra la sua giustizia quando chiede a Cristo di andare sulla croce. Il mondo è giudicato dalla croce di Cristo perché se l’unico giusto ed innocente muore condannato, ciò significa che sulla terra non c’è giustizia. Ma la croce non solo giudica il mondo, ma lo giustifica anche, perché proprio in quel momento il mondo viene salvato. È quindi nel vangelo che la giustizia si rende manifesta in maniera inaudita.

Dopo averci detto rapidamente che il vangelo rivela la giustizia divina, Paolo in 1,18-3,20 cambia il discorso centrandosi non sulla giustizia divina ma sull’ingiustizia umana. L’apostolo parte dall’ira di Dio e dice:

In realtà l'ira di Dio si rivela dal cielo contro ogni empietà e ogni ingiustizia di uomini che soffocano la verità nell'ingiustizia, 

Qui l’apostolo comincia a parlarci dell’ira divina. L’ira di Dio non è un sentimento, ma l’esercizio della giustizia divina rispetto al comportamento umano. È come se Paolo volesse dirci che se Dio dovesse agire in base ai parametri dell’umana giustizia dovrebbe andare necessariamente nell’ira perché gli uomini hanno un comportamento iniquo e ingiusto. In 1,18-31 Paolo osserva principalmente il versante pagano dell’umanità. Essi sono tutti idolatri. Pur potendo conoscere Dio con la ragione hanno adorato animali, quadrupedi, serpenti. Inoltre a livello sessuale sono sporcaccioni, in quanto si sono pervertiti andando nell’omosessualità e nei rapporti contro natura. Qui Paolo fa un discorso nero, esasperato contro i pagani. Gli ebrei chiamavano i pagani “cani” in quanto come i cani erano notoriamente bisessuali. Gesù invece con tenerezza infinita dirà alla sirofenicia che non è bene prendere il pane dei figli e darlo ai cagnolini. Cagnolini, no cani come dicevano gli ebrei. Crisostomo, commentando questi versetti, disse che bisognava mettere a morte gli omosessuali non comprendendo però Paolo. L’apostolo qui vuole soltanto mostrare quanto grande sia il peccato dell’umanità pagana. Ed utilizza i motivi della propaganda giudaica antipagana. Essi vengono infatti anche descritti con una lista impressionante di vizi:

[29] colmi come sono di ogni sorta di ingiustizia, di malvagità, di cupidigia, di malizia; pieni d'invidia, di omicidio, di rivalità, di frodi, di malignità; diffamatori, [30] maldicenti, nemici di Dio, oltraggiosi, superbi, fanfaroni, ingegnosi nel male, ribelli ai genitori, [31] insensati, sleali, senza cuore, senza misericordia. 

Se Dio dovesse intervenire nei confronti di una simile umanità farebbe bene ad andare nell’ira, distruggendoli tutti. Il giudeo che ascolta questo ragionamento di Paolo gode, pensando che finalmente anche l’apostolo ha capito che razza di uomini sono quei pagani a cui lui sta portando l’annuncio del Vangelo. Sono idolatri, depravati, meritevoli della giusta condanna da parte di Dio!

Ma Paolo dopo aver passato in rassegna i pagani, comincia ad esaminare anche i giudei al capitolo 2:

[1] Sei dunque inescusabile, chiunque tu sia, o uomo che giudichi; perché mentre giudichi gli altri, condanni te stesso; infatti, tu che giudichi, fai le medesime cose. 

Se il grande peccato del pagano è l’idolatria, il giudeo invece è uno molto giudicante, un giudice implacabile degli altri, il cui peccato fondamentale consiste non nell’idolatria, ma nella schlerokardia, nella durezza del cuore[5]. Chi giudica ha già peccato e i giudei giudicano con durezza di cuore. Qui Paolo mostra il comportamento dell’uomo religioso, di colui che si sente dalla parte di Dio, ma che giudica i pagani come cani bastardi. Il giudeo rispetto al pagano dice che Dio li punirà, ma quando vede il suo peccato afferma invece che Dio è buono, Dio è paziente, Dio è misericordioso. Questo è vero! Ma uno può dirlo solo alla fine del suo peccato, non all’inizio. Quando pecco e mi volgo indietro posso dire che Dio è buono. Ma prima del peccato non posso dire: va bene, posso peccare tanto Dio è buono. Non funziona così.  È come se Dio è mio e so come comportarmi con lui. Ma anche questa è idolatria.

Ecco perché Paolo comincia a ricordare al giudeo la sua stessa teologia attraverso alcuni assiomi teologici da tutti condivisi. Un primo assioma è che Dio retribuisce ciascuno secondo le sue opere. Dio dà vita eterna a chi opera il bene ma anche tribolazione e angoscia a chi fa il male. È la teologia classica della retribuzione. Ma con alcune sottolineature che Paolo prende in prestito dai profeti dell’AT. In primo luogo, il giudizio di Dio comincia nella sua casa. I primi ad essere giudicati saranno gli ebrei, perché loro hanno avuto la legge, i doni, l’alleanza: chi più ha avuto più gli verrà chiesto conto. I primi ad essere giudicati da Dio saranno vescovi e preti.

Il secondo assioma è che Dio è imparziale, non fa differenza tra le persone. Rispetto alla retribuzione negativa non c’è differenza etnica. Se fai il male, a qualsiasi popolo appartieni, sei condannato. Questo è tipico dell’AT. Con i giudei Paolo utilizza allora in modo massiccio i temi della letteratura profetica, quando questi si scagliano contro il popolo di Israele nel momento in cui si allontana da Dio. Gli ebrei si vantano dalla legge ma non sempre averla è un vantaggio perché chi non ha la legge e pecca può dire che non lo sapeva, ma chi ha la legge e pecca è più grave. È più grave rubare la marmellata dopo che mamma ti ha detto di non prenderla. Gli ebrei si vantano di avere la legge, che è lampada per i suoi passi e luce sul suo cammino (Sal 118). Ma anche il pagano ha una legge interna (la coscienza). La coscienza è per Paolo un Mosè interiore. Se un pagano la ascolta riesce a camminare nella via della giustizia e quindi a salvarsi.

Le altre prerogative degli ebrei sono il vanto di essere giudei e di essere sicuri sulla legge. Paolo però ricorda agli ebrei alcuni peccati tipici dei giudei: rubare nei templi, conservando in casa piccoli idoli d’oro, presi qua e la come relique, sensibilità eccessiva al fascino femminile, medico che non cura se stesso. È sempre un ragionamento paradossale. Poi la ciliegina sulla torta è quando l’apostolo ricorda l’invettiva profetica:

[24] Infatti il nome di Dio è bestemmiato per causa vostra tra i pagani, come sta scritto. 

Testo che provoca molto gli ebrei, che se la prendevano tanto al riguardo, visto che gli viene rinfacciato che con i loro comportamenti facevano fare brutta figura a Dio. È come se a noi dicessero: Vai in chiesa, vai a Messa tutti i giorni e poi ti comporti così e così. Con il buon comportamento il nome di Dio viene venerato, viceversa viene bestemmiato.

Terzo motivo di vanto degli ebrei è la circoncisione. Ma Paolo ricorda loro la predicazione di Geremia: Dio vuole la circoncisione del cuore, non quella del prepuzio. Quindi avere la legge, essere giudeo o essere circonciso non mi salva, perché ciò che conta davanti alla giustizia di Dio è non operare il male. Ed invece anche il giudeo, come già il pagano non può essere considerato giusto davanti a Dio.

Paolo sta così dimostrando come tutti gli uomini sono peccatori ed ha fatto un livellamento etnico rispetto alla retribuzione negativa. Se uno si comporta male o è giudeo o e pagano va incontro alla retribuzione negativa. L’apostolo riconosce pure una grandezza ai giudei e il privilegio di essere il popolo eletto a cui Dio ha affidato la sua parola, anche perchè ci sono tanti buoni ebrei. Ma non per questo essi sono superiori perché la verità fondamentale è che tutti gli uomini sono sotto il dominio del peccato. Tutti sono peccatori. A conferma di questa tesi Paolo mette insieme versetti dell’AT che affermano questa verità. Si tratta di un centone scritturistico, secondo la tecnica della catena di perle, cioè una serie di citazione riguardanti un medesimo tema (haruzin) [6], in cui viene mostrata l’universalità del peccato e la sua presenza in tutte le parti del corpo umano:

[10] come sta scritto: Non c'è nessun giusto, nemmeno uno, 
[11] non c'è sapiente, non c'è chi cerchi Dio! 
[12] Tutti hanno traviato e si son pervertiti; 
non c'è chi compia il bene, non ce n'è neppure uno. 
[13] La loro gola è un sepolcro spalancato, 
tramano inganni con la loro lingua
veleno di serpenti è sotto le loro labbra
[14] la loro bocca è piena di maledizione e di amarezza. 
[15] I loro piedi corrono a versare il sangue; 
[16] strage e rovina è sul loro cammino 
[17] e la via della pace non conoscono. 
[18] Non c'è timore di Dio davanti ai loro occhi

Paolo ha qui mostrato come il male sia presente nell’uomo ovunque. E la legge non può certo aiutarlo ad uscire da questa situazione, perché sulla base della legge nessuno può mostrarsi giustificato davanti a Dio. La legge, infatti, ha la capacità di mostrare il peccato, di farlo vedere, ma senza dare la possibilità e la forza di superarlo. Ecco allora che la sezione di 1,18-3,20 termina con una affermazione drammatica:

[19] Ora, noi sappiamo che tutto ciò che dice la legge lo dice per quelli che sono sotto la legge, perché sia chiusa ogni bocca e tutto il mondo sia riconosciuto colpevole di fronte a Dio. [20] Infatti in virtù delle opere della legge nessun uomo sarà giustificato davanti a lui, perché per mezzo della legge si ha solo la conoscenza del peccato.

Allora se Dio dovesse intervenire con la sua ira, secondo giustizia, allora non ci sarebbe salvezza per l’uomo. Allora c’è bisogno di una giustizia diversa. Nessuno di noi può accampare meriti di fronte a Dio, c’è troppo dislivello. Se isoliamo questa struttura Rm 1 – 3, 20 non si regge da sola, è necessario che da questa situazione disperata dell’umanità si esca, ciò che mostrerà in 3, 21  - 4, 25.

Per uscire da questa condizione di deficienza assoluta c’è bisogno di qualcos’altro.

L’atto nuovo che non era lecito aspettarsi è la fede in Cristo. E’ lui che cambia la situazione dell’umanità. Cristo è il luogo dove si manifesta la stessa giustizia di Dio. Dio è sommamente giusto in Cristo. Emerge un altro quadro di giustizia. Non è un giudizio forense, umana, ma è diversa. I sintagmi vanno sviscerati uno ad uno. Il primo è “senza la legge”. Tutto questo è accaduto senza che intervenisse la Torah perché è un atto assolutamente gratuito. Se è vero che questa giustizia è indipendente è anche vero che se n’era parlato nell’AT (leggi e profeti, è un merismo cioè attraverso 2 membri si dice la totalità). Già nella scrittura era presente il quadro nuovo della giustizia di Dio. Sarebbe bastato leggere bene la scrittura. La fede in Cristo è ciò che fa scendere su tutti i credenti la giustizia di Dio. Ma come io posso sapere di essere in una posizione di giustizia con Dio? Abbiamo visto che nessuno è giusto ma la fede in Cristo ci mette in una relazione di giustizia. Lo si può intendere come genitivo soggettivo e oggettivo. Soggettivo è la fede di Gesù Cristo. Questa linea ci porta la salvezza, ci salva il fatto che Cristo ha vissuto la fede in modo eccezionale, come camminiamo noi, come cammino Abramo. Ma questa interpretazione è contrastata dal fatto che mai si dice in modo soggettivo ovvero non c’è un versetto che si dice che Gesù credette in Dio, rimane la via oggettiva sarebbe la fede in Gesù Cristo. La migliore è la mediana cioè la fede come ci è stata mostrata, trasmessa, insegnata da Gesù Cristo. Emerge poi di nuovo “per tutti i credenti”, circoncisi e incirconcisi.

Il quadro dell’ira e della giustizia di Dio sono accomunati dal fatto che Dio non fa preferenza di persona né dal punto di vista negativo che positivo. Perché? Qui abbiamo i fatti, principi e autorità. Ora vediamo i fatti. In genere il fatto si racconta, qui è già probativa. Si riprende brevemente ciò che ha già dimostrato in 2 ma aggiunge che sono privi della gloria di Dio, c’è un primo riferimento ad Adamo che sarà poi onnipresente nel cap. 8. Tutti questi peccatori giustificati gratuitamente, qui ricorre all’accumulo del vocabolario redentivo: Dorean (Grazia), cariti (carità), apolutrosis (redenzione riscatto), ilasterion (espiazione), aima (sangue) [7]. Nel lessico redentivo è l’idea che qualcuno ha dovuto pagare un riscatto per ottenere ciò che si era perso, costui è  Gesù Cristo. Abbiamo un idea più chiara se andiamo all’ilasterion. Questo è la parte superiore dell’arca dell’Alleanza,una lamina d’oro che copre l’arca, in ebraico kapporet. Nel giorno dello Yom kippur, giorno dell’espiazione dove si versano tutti i peccati su un capro e poi mandato nel deserto a morire con tutti i peccati. Ogni sinagoga ha il suo capto emissario, nel tempi c’è il capro espiatorio che viene scannato e il sangue viene raccolto e versato sull’Arca dell’Alleanza. Nel momento in cui il sangue tocca l’ilasterion i peccati sono rimessi. Il testo del tashlick e Mi 19, 20. Ormai è Lui, Cristo, il luogo dove il peccato dell’umanità viene rimesso, cancellato, attraverso la fede nel suo sangue, nel senso che il sangue di Cristo ha valore salvifico. E’ lui il nuovo ilasterion, quindi la giustizia di Dio è la croce di Cristo. Allora bisogna recuperare la bontà della cristologia vicaria. E’ vero che il fatto che un padre chiede al figlio questo urta, ma è per noi e al posto nostro, cioè Cristo l’ha voluto lui stesso.

Veniamo, ora, ai principi. La prima conseguenza è dov’è il vanto? Abbiamo una diatriba con un interlocutore fittizio. Il vanto non c’è perché la legge non ce l’ha fatta a salvarci, ma c’è la legge della fede ovvero il contenuto del suo pensiero. Paolo ora fa cardine sul monoteismo, che è Dio di tutti e se lo è di tutti pagani e giudei anche per la giustificazione dovrà seguire la stessa strada, se salva la circoncisione dovrà salvare anche la non circoncisione, se Dio retribuisce il peccato a tutti allo stesso modo allora non c’è differenza nella retribuzione negativa, questo lo dice anche l’ebreo, ora perché nella retribuzione positiva questo non ci deve essere perché incirconcisi, Dio fa differenza forse? Abbiamo visto di no. Allora il pio giudeo distrugge la legge in virtù della fede. Paolo dice invece che sta confermando la legge, è il compimento della legge di Gesù.  Non abrogare ma compiere, è tipico dei rabbini cercare di compiere oggi la legge.

Che dire di Abramo? È stato giustificato in base ad un comportamento? Gn 15, 6 dove ricorre per la prima volta della giustizia di Dio che è associata al verbo credere, “Abramo credette e fu giustificato”. Se uno ha lavorato bisogna pagarlo per il lavoro. A colui che non compie opere ma crede allora questa fede è sufficiente per la giustizia. Qui si recupera l’AT dove Dio è capace di salvare l’empio, la giustificazione dell’empio dove si basa Lutero. Ma non è giusto, non si può giustificare l’empio, il male, ma l’empio può credere che Dio lo salva allora Dio la salva, anche perché nessuno è giusto, tutti samo empi. I giudei dicevano che la giustificazione per fede solo per Abramo ma per la sua discendenza chiede la circoncisione. E infatti cita Davide, Sal 32 al v. 7. Davide è un circonciso, è un figlio di Abramo e ha fatto uccidere Uria, Davide è colpevole di due peccati enormi che per la legge ebraica non c’è remissione, l’omicidio e l’adulterio. Davide sperimentando il suo fallimento ricorre alla fede in colui che giustifica l’empio. Non può far leva sulla sua circoncisione per rientrare in un rapporto di amicizia con Dio, non può far leva neppure nelle opere della legge come un sacrificio. Lui pone solo un atto di fede, e nel momento che scopre di essere perdonato ecco che canta questo salmo. Qui si mostra che Dio non conta, non è un ragioniere mentre in altri testi si dice che Dio conta. Paolo allora si rivolge ad Abramo che crede nella fede in 15, 6 quando non era ancora circonciso. Paolo ha dato così scacco all’ebraismo dove solo la fede è garanzia di salvezza dove Davide si rivolge a Gn 15, 6 all’Abramo incirconciso e non a Gn 15, 17 Abramo circonciso[8].

Un buon punto di partenza per dirimere la questione è il riesame più approfondito del paragone di 4,4-5. Il caso invocato dall’apostolo in questi due versetti tanto cari al paradigma classico ha del paradossale dal momento che paragona l’uomo che lavora all’empio; e confrontando queste due categorie estreme afferma che la giustizia può non necessariamente riguardare il lavoratore perché, se così fosse, si rimarrebbe nel campo del riconoscimento, dell’assolvenza, della prestazione, dell’adempi­mento. Paolo, invece, associa la parola giustizia al fatto che l’empio, rinunciando alla sua empietà, apre la sua visione a Dio e questo è il criterio della giustizia. L’uomo giusto non è in prima battuta colui che fa le opere o che lavora, ma colui che nonostante la sua empietà crede. A motivo della sua fede quest’uomo non è più empio. Si può dire lo stesso di uno che compie le opere, senza la fede? Si può dire che il lavoratore non sarà mai empio? O nel voler fondare la sua giustizia su ciò che lui fa, e non in Dio, si dimostra egli già empio?

L’empio che apre le porte alla fede cancella ogni forma di empietà in rapporto a Dio, perché si affida. Il lavoratore non è detto che si affidi, anzi può addirittura fare del suo criterio di responsabilità un baluardo di giustizia con cui colpire gli uomini che non lavorano, a partire da discorsi normativi, che sono pure leciti e giusti nell’ambito umano, ma secondari di fronte a Dio. Come il v. 2 aveva già escluso la possibilità di far valere le opere nel processo di giustificazione, così il paragone di 4,4-5 ribadisce questa verità. Colui che riceve il computo della sua fede a giustizia è uno che non lavora, che non compie opere. E neppure il fatto che egli crede in Colui che giustifica l’empio è considerato un’opera, altrimenti sarebbe uno che lavora, mentre la sua fede nella giustificazione dell’empio da parte di Dio non gli cancella lo status di uno che non compie opere. Da 4,4-5 si può, quindi, già intuire come Paolo voglia negare che la fede sia un’opera tale da richiedere un salario secondo il criterio del debito o della paga. Ma perché questa idea riceva certificazione scritturistica è necessario che la GS compia la prima parte del suo percorso inferenziale.

Solo a questo punto emergono, infatti, in maniera chiara, i due regimi teologici tra loro contrapposti, che l’apostolo ha prima scisso e poi riassociato: fede/opere di Legge, grazia/dovuto. Nel nuovo impianto paolino, che è poi quello originariamente più antico, il rapporto tra l’uomo e Dio non viene fondato sull’orizzontalità delle prestazioni, ma sulla verticalità di una relazione, in cui l’uomo è in uno stato di beatitudine, dal momento che di fronte al suo peccato non trova un “contabile”, ma Colui che giustifica l’empio, come Davide insegna. Di conseguenza il paragone del lavoratore, troppo spesso disatteso dalla new perspective, davvero offre uno dei criteri di partenza di Rm 4 nella misura in cui questo sarà poi biblicamente mostrato come vero mediante GS. In questa maniera Paolo dice innanzitutto al negativo quello che non vale davanti a Dio: non c’è spazio per la logica dell’assolvimento o del debito; ciò sarebbe un commercio, uno scambio, un baratto. Il criterio della giustizia, invece, l’unico che possa essere veramente valido, è la grazia, che ricade su chi crede in Colui che giustifica l’empio. Abramo, fondandosi su tale fede, stabilisce il criterio di priorità riguardo a ciò che ha valore davanti a Dio in prima battuta (la fede che è riconosciuta a giustizia) e a ciò che ne consegue solo in un secondo momento (come la circoncisione che subentra subito dopo). Di conseguenza la stessa GS impone di non abbandonare con troppa facilità aspetti del paradigma classico che la new perspective ha sovente sottovalutato[9].

In questa direzione il discorso sul salario di Rm 4,4-5 serve a dire che il rapporto uomo-Dio non si muove sulla base di una simmetria, cioè che da tanto scaturisce tanto, ma è una realtà completamente asimmetrica in cui Dio dona gratuitamente, a prescindere da appartenenze legate alla situazione etnica di partenza. Dietro la negazione dei criteri commerciali si nasconde, allora, una discussione ben più fondamentale che tocca le modalità stesse attraverso cui si esplica la giustizia divina: Dio non si muove in base alla logica del salario, ma sulle vie di un atteggiamento di grazia, così come si può avere con un empio.

Ma se Dio agisce così, non è forse questo che si chiede al giudeo, testimone primo dell’agire del Dio di Abramo? In tal senso Rm 4,4 è una espressione chiaramente rivolta al pio giudeo, l’operaio del debito A questo livello Paolo rifiuta qualsiasi dogmatismo etnico per aprirsi ad una verità viva che ha davanti ai suoi occhi: l’allargamento della famiglia di Abramo al di fuori dell’ambito esclusivo della circoncisione. E non si può certo dire che l’apostolo abbia forzato indebitamente i testi scritturistici per adattarli alle sue esigenze personali missionarie. Tutt’altro. Egli ha colto in maniera precisa come il vero contrassegno della benedizione di tutte le genti in Abramo sia appunto la fede e non la circoncisione. Con questo, però, non si intende dire che Paolo sviluppi i suoi argomenti per sostenere biblicamente le forme del suo apostolato verso i pagani. Al contrario, la centralità accordata alle modalità della giustificazione non costituisce soltanto il tentativo di fronteggiare un problema a carattere etnico o missionario, ma tocca in primo luogo l’essenza stessa di Dio: si tratta di dimostrare che Egli è giusto ed esercita la sua giustizia gratuitamente e su tutti. Quanto realizzato in Cristo non è poi una novità così assoluta, come potrebbe sembrare: Dio ha sempre agito con grazia verso tutti gli uomini, giustificandoli e perdonandoli sempre per mezzo della fede e a prescindere da qualsiasi opera. Nel presente è divenuto solo manifesto al massimo livello quanto era però già ampiamente testimoniato in AT. In tal senso, la GS con le sue analogie di difformità rende un servizio primario alla verità di Dio da cui discendono poi applicazioni teologicamente conseguenti sull’estensione della famiglia di Abramo.

Le conclusioni paoline relative al tema Legge/grazia non vanno inquadrate, però, soltanto alla luce delle inferenze tipiche di una GS. È, infatti, altresì possibile una loro disamina a partire dalla categoria del paradosso, del cui esercizio l’apostolo è un maestro. Nel nostro caso, Paolo lascia intendere proprio per via logico-deduttiva la non necessarietà di usare categorie concettuali di conseguenza logica (come ad esempio: se uno è circonciso è nello spazio della grazia di Dio), perché questo non appartiene alla logica di Dio. Dio paradossalmente, ma anche logicamente, salta passaggi apparentemente logici, nel momento in cui, per ragioni sue che sono di gran lunga più logiche, dona la grazia. Dio non ha bisogno della Legge, perché la sua logica la prescinde totalmente in ordine a giustificazione e perdono. Dio con Abramo ha saltato la circoncisione e con Davide ha saltato la Legge. Il re ha commesso due grossi delitti quali l’adulterio e l’omicidio per cui la Legge invoca sanzioni. Nonostante questo, Dio ha concesso a Davide il perdono, per ragioni che sfuggono alla logica legale, e che vanno ricercate nell’essere stesso di Dio, nella sua più intima essenza. Non c’è, quindi, conseguenza lineare tra l’essere all’interno della Legge e l’essere all’interno della grazia di Dio, perché nella grazia di Dio si è per altre ragioni, che vanno ricercate più nel cuore del credente (come lascia intendere Rm 2,29 con la menzione della peritomh. kardi,aj evn pneu,mati ouv gra,mmati). Se poi uno è nella norma mosaica tanto meglio, a motivo della coerenza che questa ha con i dettami che Dio stesso ha promulgato. Ma a patto che la si osservi integralmente.

Morte e resurrezione vanno tenute insieme nella loro relazione profonda: Gesù muore sulla croce come gesto generoso di amore per giustificare l’uomo dai suoi peccati. Limitare alla sola morte la relazione con il peccato equivale ad esaltare una impostazione punitiva, facendone quasi una sconfitta. Ma la morte di Cristo non è assimilabile alla punizione dell’uomo: Egli muore così salva noi che siamo peccatori. È, invece, un gesto di generosità, un atto di ulteriore ed estrema speranza nell’uomo, come se si dicesse che in Gesù è espressa una tale fiducia nella possibilità della giustificazione per l’uomo fino al punto da morire per noi, nonostante il peccato. Nella risurrezione vi è poi il trionfo di questa logica, perché nella resurrezione[10] vi è la giustificazione “alleggerita” dai peccati, perché Gesù ha vinto. Di conseguenza la morte in croce, nonostante la sua novità assoluta, è un rinnovare analogamente l’anti-co in un atteggiamento tale di fiducia da poter dire che Dio crede profondamente che ciò che è stato Abramo potrà essere ogni uomo, a patto che creda. Il richiamo finale al Cristo morto e risorto esprime, dunque, ad un livello sommo che il desiderio di Dio di giustificare e dare vita agli uomini non è cambiato da Abramo a noi. Anzi, la generosità di Dio ha raggiunto il punto più alto con il dono di suo Figlio agli uomini. Se così non fosse e veramente Paolo volesse sottolineare l’aspetto punitivo, la giustificazione avverrebbe sul piano di chi giudica l’empio, anche se poi lo salva. Ma al v. 5 il Dio di Abramo è descritto come Colui che giustifica l’empio, al di fuori di ogni commercializzazione dell’opera. Perché il regime economico, bandito per l’uomo, dovrebbe poi essere valido tra Dio Padre e suo Figlio? Tradurre questo portato non è facile, ma concettualmente le categorie linguistiche usate da esegeti e teologi per rendere il v. 25 appaiono talvolta davvero anguste. Morte e resurrezione sono, invece, due elementi che si confermano a vicenda, pur nella scansione temporale che li caratterizza: Gesù muore e risorge per giustificarci dai nostri peccati.

Pasquale Basta

Professore di Sacra Scrittura

Pontificia Università Urbaniana




[1] Circa la radicale dik- cf. K. Kertelge, «Rechtfertigung» bei Paulus. Studien zur Struktur und zum Bedeutungsgehalt des paulinischen Rechtfertigungsbegriffs (NTA 3; Münster: Aschendorff, 1967); tr. it. «Giustificazione» in Paolo. Studi sulla struttura e sul significato del concetto paolino di giustificazione (GLNT.S 5; Brescia: Paideia, 1991).

[2] Su Qumran la bibliografia è enorme; cf. solo G. J. Brooke, The Dead Sea Scrolls and the New Testament (Philadelphia, PA: Fortress, 2005).F. García Martínez (ed.), Echoes from the Caves. Qumran and the New Testament (Studies on the Texts of the Desert of Judah 85; Leiden – Boston: Brill, 2009); L. H. Schiffman – J. C. VanderKam (ed.), Encyclopedia of the Dead Sea Scrolls (Oxford: University Press, 2000) I-II; H. Stegemann, Die Essener, Qumran, Johannes der Täufer und Jesus. Ein Sachbuch (Spektrum 4128; Freiburg: Herder, 1993); tr. it. Gli Esseni, Qumran, Giovanni Battista e Gesù. Una monografia (Collana di studi religiosi; Bologna: EDB, 1995); tr. sp. Los esenios, Qumrán, Juan Bautista y Jesús (Colección estructuras u procesos Serie Religión; Madrid: Trotta, 1996); tr. ingl. The Library of Qumran. On the Essenes, Qumran, John the Baptist, and Jesus (Grand Rapids, MI – Leiden: Eerdmans – Brill, 1998); J. C. VanderKam, From Joshua to Caiaphas. High Priests after the Exile (Minneapolis, MN – Assen: Fortress – Van Gorcum, 2004); J. C. VanderKam, The Dead Sea Scrolls Today (Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans, 1994); tr. it. Manoscritti del Mar Morto. Il dibattito recente oltre le polemiche (Roma: Città Nuova, 1995); J. C. VanderKam – P. Flint, The Meaning of the Dead Sea Scrolls. Their Significance for Understanding the Bible, Judaism, Jesus, and Christianity (New York: HarperSanFrancisco, 2002).

[3] Su Isaia 56 cf. J. D. W. Watts, Isaiah 35-66 (WBC 25; Waco, TX: Word Books, 1987; Nashville, TN: Th. Nelson, 22006); P. D. Hanson, Isaiah 40-66 (Interpretation. A Bible Commentary for Teaching and Preaching; Louisville, KY: John Knox, 1995); B. S. Childs, Isaiah. A Commentary (OTL; London: SCM – Louisville, KY: John Knox Westminster, 2000); J. L. Koole, Isaiah III (Historical Commentary on the Old Testament; Leuven: Peeters, 2001); J. Blenkinsopp, Isaiah 56-66. A New Translation with Introduction and Commentary (AB 19B; New York: Doubleday, 2003); J. Goldingay, Isaiah 56-66 (A Critical and Exegetical Commentary; London – New York: T&T Clark, 2013).

[4] Tra i tanti commentari a Romani cf. C. E. B. Cranfield, A Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (ICC; Edinburgh: Clark, 1987) I-II; C. K Barrett, A Commentary on the Epistle to the Romans (BNTC; London 1957; London – New York 21991); J. D. G. Dunn, Romans (WBC 38A, 38B; Dallas, TX: Word Books, 1988); J. A. Fitzmyer, Romans (AncB 33; New York: Doubleday, 1993); D. J. Moo, The Epistle to the Romans (NICNT; Grand Rapids, MI 1996); L. T. Johnson, Reading Romans. A Literary and Theological Commentary (Reading the New Testament series; New York 1997); C. Bryan, A Preface to Romans. Notes on the Epistle in its Literary and Cultural Setting (Oxford 2000); C. H. Talbert, Romans (SHBC; Macon, GA 2002).

[5] Su questi capitoli molto difficili cf. J. N. Aletti, Justification by faith in the Letters of Saint Paul: keys to interpretation (Analecta Biblica. Studia 5; Gregorian & Biblical Press, Roma 2015).

[6] Sull’ermeneutica giudaica cf. D. Patte, Early Jewish Hermeneutic in Palestine (SBL DS 22; Missoula 1975); H. L. Strack – G. Stemberger, Einleitung in Talmud und Midrasch, Beck, München 71982; M. Fishbane, Biblical Interpretation in Ancient Israel (Oxford 1985); J. Neusner, What is Midrash? (Philadelphia 1987); R. Kasher, «The Interpretation of Scripture in Rabbinic Literature», Mikra. Text, Translation, Reading and Interpretation of the Hebrew Bible in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity (ed. M. J. Mulder) (Philadelphia/Assen/Mastricht 1988) 547-594; R. N. Longenecker, Biblical Exegesis in the Apostolic Period (Grand Rapids MI 1992).

[7] Cf. P. Basta, «L’accumulo del vocabolario redentivo in Rm 3,21-26. Motivazioni e pertinenze», in Studium Personae III/2 (2012) 61-80.

[8] Al riguardo cf. P. Basta, «La utilización paulina de la gezerah shawah rabínica. De la halakah sobre pesah de Hillel al Abraham de Rom 4», in Revista Bíblica 72 (2010) 53-89; Id., «Paul and the gezerah shawah: A Judaic Method in the Service of Justification by Faith», in T. G. Casey – J. Taylor (eds.) Paul’s Jewish Matrix (Bible in Dialogue 2; Roma – Mahwah, NJ 2011) 123-165.

[9] Su questi temi cf. P. Basta, Abramo in Romani 4. L’analogia dell’agire divino nella ricerca esegetica di Paolo (Analecta Biblica 168; Pontificio Istituto Biblico, Roma 2007).

[10] Sulla resurrezione cf. L. Novakovic, Raised from the Dead According to Scripture. The Role of Israel’s Scripture in the Early Christian Interpretations of Jesus’ Resurrection (T & T Clark Jewish and Christian Texts in Contexts and Related Studies Series 12; London - New Delhi, Bloomsbury, 2012).